Sugar Glider

Scientific Name: 
Petaurus breviceps (peh-TAR-us breh-vih-ceps)
Bat Habitat Range
Range: 
Northern and eastern Australia, New Guinea, Tasmania, and certain nearby islands.
Habitat: 
Forests of all types but show preference for eucalyptus trees, which is a food staple.
Lifespan: 
Average in the wild: 4-5 years. In captivity they often live 8–10 years, though 15 years is possible.
Diet: 
Sugar gliders are omnivores, favoring sweet sap (especially that of the eucalyptus tree) nectar, small insects and larvae, arachnids, and small vertebrates.
Reproduction: 
Sugar gliders are Marsupials so gestation usually lasts a mere 16 days. Females give birth to a underdeveloped neonate. At birth the joey weighs 0.19 grams, about as much as an unshelled sunflower seed! Sugar gliders usually have a litter size of 1-2 joeys, The young first leaves the pouch after about 2.5 months, and are completely independent after about 4 months.
Behavior: 
Sugar gliders are very social. In the wild they nest in groups of 7-10 related individuals. They are very territorial and will attack outsiders. Males scent mark their territory with one dominant male being responsible for most of the marking.
Description: 
Sugar gliders communicate through a variety of sounds (from a small squeaky bark, chirp or hissing sound as greeting, to a loud locust-sounding vibration when displeased). Sugar gliders are NOT rodents, but like flying squirrels, sugar gliders have a gliding membrane (patagium). At night, when they are awake, sugar gliders are extremely active animals that can glide up to 45 meters (148 feet or nearly half a football field), and has been observed catching moths in flight.
Conservation Status: 
Common in their range.
At OBC: 
OBC animals came from California where it is illegal to have sugar gliders as pets, so the rescue centers often receive confiscations. One such center asked OBC to provide a home for the gliders under their care. We have Pepper, Acacia, MoMo, Matilda and Rafa.

Printable Information: 
© 2012 Organization for Bat Conservation
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